Irish Republic? Where?

Recently, as I was listening to the news segment on Today FM – an Irish Free State radio station owned by a rampant Capitalist – I noted a report upon the proposal that all Irish citizens are to be given the right to vote in Irish Presidential elections. This franchise is to be extended to anyone – regardless of where they are in the world – who meet the criteria for Irish citizenship.

The newscaster stated that ‘hundred’s of thousands, if not a million or more, who live abroad’ may be eligible to vote. No mention was made by him of the hundred’s of thousands of Irish citizens who live in the Irish Occupied Six Counties (OSC). Although these OSC residents live under a different authority, they do not live abroad. Yet they were overlooked in the news piece.

The reason that I write about this is not because of one inaccurate and shoddy news report. It is because said report is but one of a multitude of similar inaccurate reports, and is symptomatic of a malaise that exists within the 26 county state, namely an increasing tendency to view the OSC as somehow other than Irish or part of Ireland.

Regularly, news reports from Dublin refer to ‘Ireland’ in the context of being equivalent to the partitionist 26 county state. The 6 north-eastern counties are excluded to the point where such a practice has become normalized.

Republicans have long known that there exists within the Free State a powerful lobby who would relish the opportunity to fully rejoin the union with Britain. Many, such as the current Taoiseach, Enda Kenny, have raised the possibility of re-entering the British Commonwealth. Such comments underlie a mindset that would see Ireland, all of it, forever tied chokingly to Britain. These same Irish Anglophiles care little about the Gaelic language or identity, preferring instead to foster a pseudo-Irish culture that closely resembles a poor man’s England. They would have Ireland as a British province.

It can be taken as given that the English Establishment (that controls Britain), has long had strong influence in the southern Irish state. Common sense, and some historical observation, would dictate that neither Westminster nor Whitehall would ever willingly permit the existence of an Irish state on its backdoor, unless the Surplass that controls the UK could also dictate the policies of its colony, either via agents/sympathizers in the civil service, media and political arena, or by a devious use of economic leverage.

As the English comedian Al Murray’s character, The Pub Landlord, once jokingly declared, Ireland is like the sidecar that is attached to the motorbike of Britain, take the motorbike away, and the sidecar is going nowhere. As is so often the case, a comedian has hit the economic nail on the head.

There is today a general panic spreading across the Free State due to the UK’s impending exit from the EU. The sidecar of the southern state might end up in stasis as its means of transport leaves it parked motionless within the struggling European superstate. Or perhaps those in said partitionist state, whose interests are most closely aligned with those of the English Surplass, might manoeuvre to more closely attach the Irish 26 counties to its former public, and now thinly disguised, colonial master.

The decision to give Irish citizens a vote in Presidential elections is to be, and will be, widely welcomed. But there may be as many as one million + living in the UK (including the OSC) who will register for such a ballot. Will such a move serve the purpose of more tightly tying the political apron strings of Britain to Ireland? Time will tell.

Meanwhile, the southern Irish media continue to disrespect the Nationalists of the OSC. The 26 counties is referred to as a ‘Republic’, yet such a definition is not yet included anywhere within the constitution of that southern state. It is clear to any neutral observer that Ireland is an entire island, and the people within that territory comprise the nation of Ireland.

The ‘Republic of Ireland’ terminology can only be accurately employed when applied to the entire nation. The word ‘Ireland’ can likewise only be used to describe the island in its entirety. The 26 county state is just that, a partitionist state, part of Ireland, but never ‘Ireland’.

So why do the Free State Establishment/Surplass, and their centres of propaganda persist in such inaccurate reports and use of terminology?

It would appear that there is a concerted move among some to weaken the links between north and south, and disassociate the OSC from the rest of the island. This is a blatant attempt to install further divisions among the people on the island, the better with which to control us all. A continuation of such an approach will serve to copper-fasten the three distinct communities on the island of Ireland; the population of the 26 counties, the Nationalists of the 6 counties, and the Unionists of the 6 counties.The consistent occurrence of such divisive reports on southern radio stations, T.V stations, newspapers etc. has the insidious effect of fixing the idea into the minds of an oblivious populace.

Six County people are now considered ‘Nordies’, different, not Irish, all British, according to a growing number of Free State citizens. At GAA games, long a stronghold of Republicans virtues, southern attendees now regularly level such names at their OSC counterparts, something that was previously unheard of.

So they push the Six Counties population further away from their fellow countrymen and women, to weaken any solidarity that might still exist. In the Free State, they weaken the true Irish identity, and further anglicize it. Additionally, they manoeuvre the state into greater economic dependence upon Britain. With divisions in place, divisive mindsets fixed and the economy in a precarious position, Commonwealth-friendly policies can be more readily applied.

The Surplass/ Establishment of both islands stand accused of playing a long game dictated from London and enacted by their acolytes in the Irish Free State. If such a tactic is not exposed, and remains unopposed, then Ireland will suffer greatly. Eventually, if left untended, the deviousness of the Surplass of the Celtic Isles will see an end to real Ireland, its aspirations, its independence and its identity.

The most obvious stumbling block to successfully wedding Ireland to Britain, however, is the thorny issue of Scottish independence. The feisty Scots have their own ideas about their future. Should they succeed in their proposed second referendum on independence, then the Establishment’s ‘Project Ireland’ will most certainly collapse. Those Irish who wish their true freedom must call to the spirit of Wallace to descend upon the prevaricating citizens of Scotland, so that they might decide wisely, as much in Ireland depends upon their courage and determination.

Yet Irish men and women should not leave our fate entirely to our Scottish cousins. A firm focus upon the Gaelic language and the Gaelic identity, as well as holding the Free State media to account, will assist in preserving and strengthening our cultural independence, and should provide a platform from which we can all reach for a future when Ireland truly can claim the honorable title of ‘Republic’.